The Wondrous Forests of Olympic National Park

Avoiding Bears in Olympic National Park

On our journey from Oregon to Washington, we spent a few days in Olympic National Park. As we began our trek through the western edge of the Olympic National Park, we kept seeing signs touting the largest trees in the world.

“See the world’s largest Spruce”, “See the world’s largest Cedar”, “See the world’s largest Douglas Fir”. Alright, it got our attention, so we stopped and took a few photos.

For a slide show of this trip, click here: http://www.webetripping.com/Gallery_USA_WA_OlympicNationalPark.asp.

The Mossy forests of Olympic National Park

The Mossy forests of Olympic National Park

World’s Largest Spruce

Our first stop was the world’s largest Spruce tree. Accessible via a quick hike, we reached it quickly. It was large. Not as large as some of the Sequoia’s we saw in Sequoia National Park, but certainly respectable in size. Notice closely on the tree, I am standing just above the base!

World's Largest Spruce

World’s Largest Spruce

World’s Largest Cedar

The Cedar was cool, you could walk inside it which offered up a great photo opp.

Worlds Largest Cedar

Worlds Largest Cedar

Worlds Largest Cedar

Worlds Largest Cedar

Along the way, we saw lots of other magnificent waterfalls and trees.

Waterfalls in Olympic National Park

Waterfalls in Olympic National Park

Trees in Olympic National Park

Trees in Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park

Kestner Homestead Trail

We also hiked the Kestner Homestead Trail, it leads back to an old homestead that they are starting to revamp for public viewing. It offered some great views and nice pictures.

As we made our way along the trail, Lynn shouted “bear!”. I turned around to see what the commotion was all about to find out that she had seen a bear cross our path only about 30 yards ahead. We high-tailed it out of there, going back the way we came in! Luckily, we had already made it through the homestead before seeing the bear, so we came back with some pictures to share.

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

Kestner Homestead Trail

We also found a cool beach called Ruby Beach that is a haven for thousands of marine creatures. It also offers up some great views of the Pacific Ocean.

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

Ruby Beach

As we ended the day, we stopped into Sol Duc Hot Springs to soak our weary bones. After relaxing in the mineral springs, we stopped by Crescent Lake. This pristine lake, created by a glacier, was spectacular. Although the pictures don’t do it justice, you could see the bottom of the lake until it dropped off into a blue hole of nothingness.

Crescent Lake

Crescent Lake

Crescent Lake

Crescent Lake

I will leave you with a couple more pictures of Port Angeles. The final one was a hoot — this raccoon was begging for scraps.

IMG_028 IMG_030

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3 thoughts on “The Wondrous Forests of Olympic National Park

  1. Pingback: 2013 in the Rear View Mirror | WeBeTripping Blog

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